Share

Viral messages on social media claim COVID-19 vaccines are magnetic, electric and capable of rendering people infertile.

Some of these claims have the tendency of aggravating COVID-19 vaccines hesitancy in Nigeria.

Daily Trust went extra miles to verify the claims of dangers of Covid-19 vaccines making the rounds in Nigeria.

● Claim one: COVID-19 vaccines can make your body magnetic.

A viral message on social media claims that COVID-19 vaccines make people magnetic.

Several people have made videos of themselves sticking coins, knives, spoons and other metallic objects to upper hands where they took the jabs, to show that the vaccines are magnetic.

VERDICT: False. There is no evidence to show that COVID-19 vaccines make the jab recipients magnetic. The Federal Government and experts have explained that there are no ingredients in the AstraZeneca vaccines or any other COVID-19 vaccines that make people exhibit magnetic properties.

Verification

The United States Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has debunked the claim that receiving a COVID-19 vaccine can cause people to be magnetic.

“Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination which is usually your arm. COVID-19 vaccines do not contain ingredients that can produce an electromagnetic field at the site of your injection. All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals,” the CDC explained.

Similarly, the National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA), has also debunked the claim of magnetism in COVID-19 vaccines.

The Executive Director, of NPHCDA, Dr Faisal Shuaib, recently said: “There are no ingredients in the AstraZeneca vaccines or any other COVID-19 vaccines that make people exhibit magnetic properties after being vaccinated for COVID-19. Scientifically, the claim does not make sense.”

Read Also  Tips for eating rice when you have diabetes

Meanwhile, a virologist, Professor Oyewale Tomori, described the claim as “ridiculous.”

Reacting to the claim on a national tv monitored by Daily Trust, the professor, who is the former President of the Nigeria Academy of Science, said there are lots of copycats as the claim started somewhere in the UK or US and has succeeded in misinforming many people across the world.

“The amount or vaccine you get is just about .5 ml. I don’t know how much metallicity could be inside that to be able to hold a magnet or metal. Remember that when you get the vaccine, your body absorbs it and it dissipates throughout your entire body. It is not as if it is remaining at the point of inoculation. Therefore, if they say there is metal there, since the vaccine goes throughout your body, then your entire body should be magnetic,” he said.

The virologist said the things people are sticking to their points of inoculations are actually things without magnetic properties.

“A silver spoon cannot be magnetised. You find some people using keys and all sorts of things,” he said.

The professor said nobody has told us what they do with their bodies before they make videos of objects sticking to their arms as ordinary sweat on their bodies can hold objects.

“Don’t ever believe what people are showing. I think it is very selfish of them. They have received the vaccination and they are trying to dissuade people from getting it. I think they are not only selfish, they are wicked,” he said.

Conclusion

The claim that COVID-19 vaccine recipients’ bodies exhibit magnetic properties is false. There is no evidence to show that COVID-19 vaccines make the bodies of the jab recipients magnetic. The Federal Government and experts have explained that there are no ingredients in the AstraZeneca vaccines or any other COVID-19 vaccines that make people exhibit magnetic properties.

Read Also  6 die of Covid-19 at FMC Asaba, 8 doctors test postive

● Claim Two: COVID-19 vaccine can light a bulb

A viral video made by Evangelist Ebube Joselp Ezeaguba, claimed that COVID-19 vaccines can electrify a human body and light bulbs.

VERDICT: False. No evidence to show that receiving COVID-19

vaccines can make the receipients’ bodies light electric bulbs. The vaccine does not contain electromagnetic properties. The claim has been severally debunked.

Verification

The Executive Director, of NPHCDA, Dr Faisal Shuaib, has also debunked the claim that bodies of receipients of COVID-19 vaccine can light electric bulbs.

Dr Shuaib said the cotets of the AstraZeneca vaccine being administered in Nigeria does not contain any property capable of lighting a buld.

For instance, the manufacturer of AstraZeneca vaccine, MedImmune UK Ltd, disclosed that the product contains genetically modified organisms (GMOs) even as the other excipients include L-histidine, L-histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, magnesium chloride hexahydrate, polysorbate 80 (E 433), ethanol, sucrose, sodium chloride, disodium edetate dihydrate and water for injections.

Conclusion

The claim that the body of a recipient of COVID-19 vaccine emits lift is false. The vaccine does not contain electromagnetic properties. The claim has been severally debunked.

● Claim three: COVID-19 vaccines designed to depopulate Africa

VERDICT: False. The claim that COVID-19 vaccine was

designed to depopulate Africa is false. Data from the National Primary Health Care Development Agency revealed about two million Nigerians have received COVID-19 jab and no one has died as as result of receiving the jab.

Read Also  COVID-19: Hotel owners unwilling to allow Nigerian govt. use their hotels as isolation centres – Onyeama

Verification

The U. S. Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has debunked claims of infertility properties in COVID-19 vaccines.

“If you are trying to become pregnant now or want to get pregnant in the future, you may get a COVID-19 vaccine when one is available to you. There is currently no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination causes any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta,” CDC stated.

The Centre further clarified that “there is no evidence that female or male fertility problems are a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines.”

Similarly, the Executive Director of the NPHCDA, Dr Faisal Shuaib, has debunked the claim that COVID-19 vaccines were designed to depopulate Africa.

He said: “Those who came up with this theory said that anybody who takes the vaccine would die immediately.

“Today, as we all can see, nearly 4 million doses of the vaccine have been administered in Nigeria and we have not recorded any case of death linked to the vaccination.”

Data from the National Primary Health Care Development Agency revealed that as at end of June, 2021, about 2 million eligible Nigerians have been vaccinated with first dose while about 45,000 of Nigerians have been vaccinated with first dose have collected their second doses.

Dr Shuaib said no one has died as a reault of the COVID-19 vaccination.

Conclusion

The claim that COVID-19 vaccine was designed to depopulate Africa is false. Data from the National Primary Health Care Development Agency revealed about two million Nigerians have received COVID-19 jab and no one has died as as result of receiving the jab.

DAILY TRUST


Share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *